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Coaching Technical Skills For Less Technical Coaches [clear filter]
Monday, August 5
 

14:00

Part 1 of 2: Facilitate Cleaning Your Code Without (Necessarily) Being a Techncial Coach (Arlo Belshee)

Abstract:
Does your team struggle with technical debt that you feel powerless to change? Messy code is organizationally complicated to fix. It requires all the developers, managers, and product owners to work together. It requires a change in habits. The new habits are not too complicated, but everyone adopting them at once is.
In this workshop you will fix the powerlessness; as soon as you get back from the conference your team can start fixing the code.
As a leader - coach, mentor, product owner, manager, or lead dev - you are good at getting people to work together towards a common goal. Yet still technical debt remains. Part of the problem is cultural; we can give some tips but that part is actually fairly easy to solve.
But a big part is that technical debt doesn't behave like a lot of other work. Code cleanup projects or stories will not help. You need to change the moment-by-moment habits of all of your developers. Technical debt is created or repaired by choices made unconsciously every 15 seconds. We need to change those choices.
Code by Refactoring helps. It exposes and changes the coding micro-habits on your team. It is a journey. And the first step is Read by Refactoring mob sessions. We have been teaching technical people to run these sessions for years. With this workshop, for the first time, we have developed a way for anyone to run Read by Refactoring sessions - even if they are not technical. Turns out you don't need to code yourself in order to teach your team a better way to code.
Join us and experience the Read by refactoring workshop, with all the materials and guidance you will need to take it home and facilitate your team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Facilitate a Read by Refactoring workshop for your own team or within your company.
  • Understand Disciplined Refactoring and how that changes the economics of software development (for the better).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Team Craftsman, Legacy Code Mender, and Rabblerouser, Tableau Software
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2019 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10

15:45

Part 2 of 2: Facilitate Cleaning Your Code Without (Necessarily) Being a Techncial Coach (Arlo Belshee)

Abstract:
Does your team struggle with technical debt that you feel powerless to change? Messy code is organizationally complicated to fix. It requires all the developers, managers, and product owners to work together. It requires a change in habits. The new habits are not too complicated, but everyone adopting them at once is.
In this workshop you will fix the powerlessness; as soon as you get back from the conference your team can start fixing the code.
As a leader - coach, mentor, product owner, manager, or lead dev - you are good at getting people to work together towards a common goal. Yet still technical debt remains. Part of the problem is cultural; we can give some tips but that part is actually fairly easy to solve.
But a big part is that technical debt doesn't behave like a lot of other work. Code cleanup projects or stories will not help. You need to change the moment-by-moment habits of all of your developers. Technical debt is created or repaired by choices made unconsciously every 15 seconds. We need to change those choices.
Code by Refactoring helps. It exposes and changes the coding micro-habits on your team. It is a journey. And the first step is Read by Refactoring mob sessions. We have been teaching technical people to run these sessions for years. With this workshop, for the first time, we have developed a way for anyone to run Read by Refactoring sessions - even if they are not technical. Turns out you don't need to code yourself in order to teach your team a better way to code.
Join us and experience the Read by refactoring workshop, with all the materials and guidance you will need to take it home and facilitate your team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Facilitate a Read by Refactoring workshop for your own team or within your company.
  • Understand Disciplined Refactoring and how that changes the economics of software development (for the better).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Team Craftsman, Legacy Code Mender, and Rabblerouser, Tableau Software
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2019 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10
 
Tuesday, August 6
 

09:00

Part 1 of 2: How to Introduce Test-Driven Development (TDD) to Your Team (James Shore)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Test-driven development (TDD) is an essential skill for agile teams. Without it, codebases quickly lose the flexibility needed to support agile development. Software accrues technical debt and becomes difficult to change. Rather than improving the code in-place, teams advocate for expensive and risky rewrites. TDD helps avoid these problems.
But for coaches, Scrummasters, and other leaders without a programming background, how can you introduce this foundational skill? In this two-part session, veteran TDD practitioner James Shore will teach you the coaching and facilitation skills you need to help your teams get started with TDD. No programming experience is required, and you won’t be doing any programming in this session. Instead, you’ll gain the resources and knowledge needed to help your teams help themselves. You’ll learn what TDD is, how to recognize when TDD is being done well, and how to facilitate TDD learning workshops without being a TDD expert yourself.

Learning Outcomes:
  • -Understanding of, and ability to explain, the core TDD loop
  • -Understanding of each component of the TDD loop (think, red, green, refactor, repeat)
  • -Ability to recognize when TDD is being done
  • -Thinking tools for evaluating the success of TDD at the team and organization level
  • -Ability to facilitate an introductory TDD workshop

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

Consultant, Titanium I.T. LLC
James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He is a recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice, co-author of /The Art of Agile Development/, and co-creator of the Agile Fluency™ Model. You can find his essays... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2019 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10

10:45

Part 2 of 2: How to Introduce Test-Driven Development (TDD) to Your Team. (James Shore)

Abstract:
Test-driven development (TDD) is an essential skill for agile teams. Without it, codebases quickly lose the flexibility needed to support agile development. Software accrues technical debt and becomes difficult to change. Rather than improving the code in-place, teams advocate for expensive and risky rewrites. TDD helps avoid these problems.
But for coaches, Scrummasters, and other leaders without a programming background, how can you introduce this foundational skill? In this two-part session, veteran TDD practitioner James Shore will teach you the coaching and facilitation skills you need to help your teams get started with TDD. No programming experience is required, and you won’t be doing any programming in this session. Instead, you’ll gain the resources and knowledge needed to help your teams help themselves. You’ll learn what TDD is, how to recognize when TDD is being done well, and how to facilitate TDD learning workshops without being a TDD expert yourself.

Learning Outcomes:
  • -Understanding of, and ability to explain, the core TDD loop
  • -Understanding of each component of the TDD loop (think, red, green, refactor, repeat)
  • -Ability to recognize when TDD is being done
  • -Thinking tools for evaluating the success of TDD at the team and organization level
  • -Ability to facilitate an introductory TDD workshop

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

Consultant, Titanium I.T. LLC
James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He is a recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice, co-author of /The Art of Agile Development/, and co-creator of the Agile Fluency™ Model. You can find his essays... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2019 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10

14:00

Part 1 of 2: Code Reviews - How to facilitate code reviews as a less-technical coach (Kim Castillo)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Abstract
Technical excellence is widely considered one of the ingredients of successful Agile teams and presumably, the session audience is interested in finding ways to support this quality.
In this session, we will address some of the conundrums of being a “less technical” coach to our teams and identify what strengths and tactics we can leverage to make the technical practice of code reviews a better experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What I hope from this session is that you walk away from here:
  • • Recognizing code reviews
  • • Find/create opportunities to facilitate high quality code reviews (and not feeling like a fraud while you’re at it)
  • • Understanding the value in engaging this practice and other areas that puts us in the “middle of all of it”


Speakers
avatar for Kim Castillo

Kim Castillo

Sr. Technical Program Manager (In reality, an embedded Agile coach and renegade), Pluto TV
I’m an Agile Coach. I’m bent on building a culture of engaged and innovative teams through thought leadership, human interactions, and coaching. Everything I do is in service to creating an environment that leads to psychological safety, experimentation, relentless learning, deep... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2019 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10

15:45

Part 2 of 2: How to facilitate code reviews as a less-technical coach (Kim Castillo)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Technical excellence is widely considered one of the ingredients of successful Agile teams and presumably, the session audience is interested in finding ways to support this quality.
In this session, we will address some of the conundrums of being a “less technical” coach to our teams and identify what strengths and tactics we can leverage to make the technical practice of code reviews a better experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What I hope from this session is that you walk away from here:
  • • Recognizing code reviews
  • • Find/create opportunities to facilitate high quality code reviews (and not feeling like a fraud while you’re at it)
  • • Understanding the value in engaging this practice and other areas that puts us in the “middle of all of it”

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kim Castillo

Kim Castillo

Sr. Technical Program Manager (In reality, an embedded Agile coach and renegade), Pluto TV
I’m an Agile Coach. I’m bent on building a culture of engaged and innovative teams through thought leadership, human interactions, and coaching. Everything I do is in service to creating an environment that leads to psychological safety, experimentation, relentless learning, deep... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2019 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10
 
Wednesday, August 7
 

14:00

Part 1 of 2: How to coach Exploratory Testing sessions (Lanette Creamer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Exploratory testing is one of the fastest ways to discover unknown and potentially subjective quality issues that go beyond requirements, like usability and integration issues. If you aren't a tester or a deeply technical coach, how do you organize and run effective exploratory testing? Given any group of participants willing to perform testing, you will be able to confidently prepare, coach, and present the results of exploratory testing sessions as well as handle anything unexpected that may come up with confidence. In part one of the workshop, you will learn how to prepare, write and review charters, and some techniques for isolating and reporting issues. You will see examples of ways to present the results of the exploratory testing session, from the simplest low tech methods to a more complex visual diagramming presentation depending on what is important to convey for that project.
In part 2 of the workshop, we will use all of these techniques into practice together, performing and leading exploratory testing. Participants should bring a laptop (preferably), tablet or at a minimum a smart phone.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will be able to write and review exploratory testing charters
  • Techniques to prioritize areas of focus using metrics
  • Organize environments so that testers can start immediately
  • Run successful exploratory testing sessions
  • Assist testers in isolating and reporting useful information without interrupting flow
  • Debrief and report results of the testing

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2019 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10

15:45

Part 2 of 2: How to coach Exploratory Testing sessions. (Lanette Creamer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Exploratory testing is one of the fastest ways to discover unknown and potentially subjective quality issues that go beyond requirements, like usability and integration issues. If you aren't a tester or a deeply technical coach, how do you organize and run effective exploratory testing? Given any group of participants willing to perform testing, you will be able to confidently prepare, coach, and present the results of exploratory testing sessions as well as handle anything unexpected that may come up with confidence. In part one of the workshop, you will learn how to prepare, write and review charters, and some techniques for isolating and reporting issues. You will see examples of ways to present the results of the exploratory testing session, from the simplest low tech methods to a more complex visual diagramming presentation depending on what is important to convey for that project.
In part 2 of the workshop, we will use all of these techniques into practice together, performing and leading exploratory testing. Participants should bring a laptop (preferably), tablet or at a minimum a smart phone.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will be able to write and review exploratory testing charters
  • Techniques to prioritize areas of focus using metrics
  • Organize environments so that testers can start immediately
  • Run successful exploratory testing sessions
  • Assist testers in isolating and reporting useful information without interrupting flow
  • Debrief and report results of the testing

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2019 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10
 
Thursday, August 8
 

09:00

Part 1 of 2: How to facilitate a Mob Programming session as a coach? (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
The Agile Manifesto Values and Principles have a strong focus on collaboration. Most of us who create software have spent much of our career working alone, and while we all want to think we can collaborate when needed we've been practicing working alone every day for most of our working life. Mob Programming emerged from the efforts of a team trying to learn to work well together, and this session will cover ways that a coach can help a team find their own style as they go from "solo contributors" to real teamwork. It's not a matter of teaching, but rather about creating a space where a team can flourish.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How a coach can enhance the ability of a team to make improvements
  • Ways to help the team find important things the team needs to improve
  • Techniques for helping team members learn to collaborate
  • Techniques for creating that space where people can flourish
  • The importance of paying attention, and some important things to focus on
  • The value of listening, and kindness, consideration, and respect
  • How to proceed if I don't know how to code?
Attachments:


Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Independent Agile Guide, Independent Agile Guide
I've been a software developer for 36+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Independent Agile Guide. I worked with the original "Mob Programming" team at Hunter Industries, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2019 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10

10:45

Part 2 of 2: How to facilitate a Mob Programming session as a coach? (Woody Zuill)

Abstract:
The Agile Manifesto Values and Principles have a strong focus on collaboration. Most of us who create software have spent much of our career working alone, and while we all want to think we can collaborate when needed we've been practicing working alone every day for most of our working life. Mob Programming emerged from the efforts of a team trying to learn to work well together, and this session will cover ways that a coach can help a team find their own style as they go from "solo contributors" to real teamwork. It's not a matter of teaching, but rather about creating a space where a team can flourish.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - How a coach can enhance the ability of a team to make improvements
  • - Ways to help the team find important things the team needs to improve
  • - Techniques for helping team members learn to collaborate
  • - Techniques for creating that space where people can flourish
  • - The importance of paying attention, and some important things to focus on
  • - The value of listening, and kindness, consideration, and respect
  • - How to proceed if I don't know how to code?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Independent Agile Guide, Independent Agile Guide
I've been a software developer for 36+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Independent Agile Guide. I worked with the original "Mob Programming" team at Hunter Industries, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2019 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10

14:00

An Introduction to Technical Coaching for Less Technical Coaches (Andrea Goulet)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The benefits of agile can’t exist without the technical practices, but acquiring those technical practices when you don’t come from a technical background can feel intimidating if not impossible. In this talk, Andrea Goulet, CEO of Corgibytes, will share the important mindsets and practices required to grow technical skills. As a self-taught developer with a background in marketing and communications, she understands the hurdles (both within yourself and the industry) and will share her tales from the trenches that will inspire you to invest in your own technical skills.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Overcome impediments for growing technical skills
  • 2. Adopt attitudes and practices for improving technical skills
  • 3. Grow facilitation skills to use with technical teams
  • 4. Implement specific technical practices in your daily work

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Goulet

Andrea Goulet

CEO, Corgibytes, LLC
Andrea Goulet is the CEO of Corgibytes, a software development shop dedicated to maintaining and modernizing software applications and has been named by LinkedIn as one of the Top 10 Professionals in Software Under 35. She’s the founder of LegacyCode.Rocks and hosts a podcast dedicated... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2019 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10